John M. Stemmons
1862 Correspondence
The below transcriptions were found on Fold3 and painstakingly transcribed, as written,
by LJHS member Mike Clay.
Thank you!!
Transcriber's Note:  The following is the statement provided by John Stemmons after he
was captured near Greenfield, Mo., and is probably in his own handwriting:

asst P M Genl                       Statement of           
Office Nov 21st 1862            Capt John M. Stemmons

I reside in Greenfield Dade County Mo I am Capt of Comp G. Jackmans Regt Inft_Rains Div “Confedt
Army”
I entered the Confederate service on the 26th June 62 near Maysville Ark under Col Cockrell for 3
yrs or the war Col Jackman I was taken Prisoner The Comd left Frog Byru 15 miles below Vanburen
on the Ark river on the 1st Aug “62 and entered Mo near the S.W. Corner of the state: and marched
from there to Lone Jack Mo on the Morning of the 16th Aug and Engagement was had between our
forces and the Federals” Col Cockrell Comdg the Confdte Troops and Maj Foster Comdg the Federal
Troops in which Engagement the Confdts held the field; I was wounded in the Left shoulder and
Carried off the field and left in the Vicinity of Lone Jack by my Comd when they it retreated south: I
remained there from the 16th of Aug 62 to the 10th of Nov.. when I left the Hospital and started South
to join the my Comd on Reaching the Vicinity of Greenfield Mo” I was Captured by Capt Breeden
Comd 8 miles South of Greenfield on the 17th inst I was After the Engagement at Lone Jack all the
wounded Federal officers soldiers & nurses were permitted to retire from the field with out being
paroled” among the officers Maj Foster was wounded and fell in our hands he was also permitted to
be removed to Lexington without being paroled or exchanged for during my stay in the vicinity of
Lone Jack I was frequently visited by Federal officers who refused to require a parole or to hold me
as a Prisoner of War from the fact that we had delt liberaly with their wounded Upon this ground I
submit that I should not be paroled or held as a Prisoner of War.
I am yet disabled and suffering from my wounds” having no use of my left arm above the Elbow
                                                                                                        John M Stemmons
                                                                                                     Capt Co “G” Col Jackman’s
                                                                                                   Regt Inft Rains Brig CSA

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Transcriber's Note:  A second statement with more complete wording, which appears to be
in a different handwriting is also in John’s file and is transcribed below:

Asst P. Marshal                                            Statement of
Office Nov 21st 1862                                  Capt John M. Stemmons

I reside in Greenfield Dade County Mo am Capt of Co G Jackmans Regt Inft. Rains Brig C. S. A. I
entered the Confederate service June 26th 1862 near Maysville, ark for the term of 3 years or the
“War”
The Comd” left Camp at Frog Byu 15 miles below Van Buern Ark. on the Ark River the 1st Aug” 1862
and entered Mo” near the S W. Corner of the State and marched to Lone Jack Mo” on the morning
of the 16th Aug 62 a Engagement was had between our forces and the Federal.” Col Cockrell
Comdg the Confed” Troops & Maj Foster the Federal Troops in which engagement the Confdt
Troops held the field. I was wounded in the left shoulder and carried off the field & left in the Vicinity
of Lone Jack by my Comd when they retreated South. I remained there from the 16th Aug” 62 to the
10th Nov” when I left the hospital and started South to join my Comd on reaching the Vicinity of
Greenfield: I was captured I was Capt Breedens Comd on the 17th inst 8 miles South of Greenfield:
After the Engagement at Lone Jack all the wounded Federal officers. Soldiers & Nurses were
permited to retire from the field without being paroled among the officers Maj. Foster was wounded
and fell in our hands he was permited to be removed to Lexington Mo. without being paroled or
exchanged for “ during my stay in the Vicinity of Lone Jack I was frequently visited by Federal officers
who refused to require a parole or to hold me as a Prisoner of War from the fact that we had delt
liberally with their wounded: Upon these grounds I submit that I should not be paroled or held as a
Prisoner of War.” I am Yet disabled and suffering from my wound: having no use of my left arm
above the elbow

                                                                                                  John M Stemmons
                                                                                               Capt Co “G” Col Jackman’s
                                                                                                 Regt Inft Rains Brig C S A

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Transcriber's Note:  Immediately below John’s statement is the following report:

Hed Quarters 7 Cav M S M
                    Newtonia Mo Nov 26 1862

I Know nothing personally of Capt Stemmons; but I do Know that his statements above made are not
history or true in every particular Major Foster (of my Regt) was not paroled. but the reason of it was
that he was supposed to be mortally wounded, and even dying when in possession of the
Confederates.
They left Lone Jack hurriedly on the approach of Col Warren, which may account for the lack of
giving Paroles to wounded prisoners. They did stay however long enough to strip Major Foster (while
weltering in brave blood and insensible) of his sabre and Pistol, and his Talma. The officers – Col
Jackman and Col Lewis I think got his side arms -
Furthermore three soldiers named  [blank space]       Vanhoy  [blank space]               Stubblefield
and [blank space]    of Compy “H” of my Regt were taken prisoners by the Confederates in this
action, they were not released, but carried off South. I conversed with one Wm Barnes but a few
days since,who had been a prisoner of Genl Raines”, made his escape, and he saw these three men
of my Regt. still prisoners, in a state of great destitution, being a foot without shoes and almost
naked, - and were well clothed when captured. I know not how men of other commands faired who
chanced to fall into the enemy’s command hands, but the above is true as to my own.
                                                                                                               Jno F Philips
                                                                                                                  Col 7th Cav M S M  

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Transcriber's Note: There is a third statement in John’s file with very fancy handwriting
and is transcribed below:

Asst. P. M. Genl                        Statement of
Office Nov 21st 1862                Capt. John M. Stemmons

I Reside in Greenfield Dade Co. Mo.
I am Capt. Of Comp “G” Jackman’s Regiment
Infantry Rains Division Conft. Army.

I entered the Confederate Service on the 26th June 1862 near Maysville Ark under Col. Cockrell for
3 years or the war. The Command left Frog Bayou 15 miles below Vanburen on the Ark. River on
Aug 1st 1862 and entered Mo. Near the S. W. Corner of the State; and marched from there to Lone
Jack Mo. On the morning 16th Aug an Engagement was had between our Forces and the Federals.
Col. Cockrell commanding the Confederate Troops and Maj Foster commanded the Federal Troops
in which engagement the Confederates held the Field; I was wounded in the left Shoulder and
carried off the Field and left in the Vicinity of Lone Jack by my command when it retreated South. I
remained there from the 16th of Aug 1862 to the 10th of Nov 1862. When I left the Hospital and
started South to join my Command; On reaching the Vicinity of Greenfield Mo. I was captured by
Capt. Breeden’s Command 8 miles South of Greenfield on the 17th Inst.
After the Engagement at Lone Jack, all the wounded, Federals, Officers, Soldiers, and Nurses were
permitted to retire from the Field without being Paroled” Among the Officers wounded was Maj.
Foster who fell into our hands. He was also permitted to be removed to Lexington, without being
Paroled or exchanged for.
During my stay in Line Jack, I was frequently visited by Federal Officers, who refused to require a
Parole or to hold me as a Prisoner of war, from the fact that we had dealt liberally with their wounded.
Upon these grounds I submit that I should not be Paroled or held as a Prisoner of War.
I am yet disabled and suffering from my wound, having no use of my left arm above the Elbow

John M. Stemmons
Capt. Co “G”. Jackmans
Regt Inft. Rain’s Brig. C.S.A.
Transcriber's Note:  On the reverse side of the original statement are the following
endorsements from various officers.

Hd Qrs 1 Brig 2 Division
Army of the Frontier
Camp Lyon Dec 1 1862

There were those Federal
officers left at Lone Jack after
the battle. Maj Foster, so seriously
wounded that he was
not expected to live for a day,
Lieut Devlin of the Battery also
so seriously injured that he was
not expected to live and Lieut
Schee of the 7th Cavy who was
the only officer left whose chance
of recovery seemed probable.
Lieut Schee was paroled and
has in consequence been mustered
from the service
Very Respectfully
Yer obt servt
Dan Huston
      Col 7 Cavly Mo Vols

Head Qrs 1 Div S W Dist
Springfield Dec 3/62
Respectfully referred to
L Col J K Mills
who will hold Capt
Stemmons as a Prisoner
of war
E B Brown
Maj Gen


Head Qrs 1 Div S W Dis
Springfield Nov 28 1862
Respectfully referred to
Col D Huston 7 Rgt
Mo Cavalry with the
[illegible word] that he note
any facts in this case
in his possession
and return to these
Head Qrs
E B Brown Maj General
Stemmons-1865 Letter
Stemmons 1863 Prison Questionaire